Rejection

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I receive a rejection letter which makes my heart sing.

I have complete and utter faith in my novel.

I am on a journey of learning about my craft unlike anything I have ever experienced.

So when the rejection letter reads to take heart because my voice shows potential, I am elated.

I receive detailed editorial feedback and am encouraged to re-submit my project.  A major publishing house recognizes in my manuscript, a novel worth publishing.

While I know there are more rejection letters to come and the publishing world is fierce, I also know the option to self-publish is always present.

I will keep perfecting this MS and start on the next instalment of my series because I cannot wait for the day I finally get to share it with all of you.

Caryn Emme Sign Off

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Writing in Deep POV

Point of View is one of those features of writing that when done well, it flawlessly takes readers through a story and brings us into each character.  When not, it frustrates readers.

Poorly edited POV is akin to being thrown into a story without the security of being safely steered through it.

This is why I have been deeply editing my manuscript.  I love stories that really take us into character and I am making the changes necessary to bring that depth into my first Regency.  And, it is tough.  So very tough.

However, the universe seems to always have answers for me when I feel lost.  My answer came on Pinterest this week in the form of a post at She’s Novel by Kristen Kieffer published April 23, 2015: How to Write in Deep POV + get inside the mind of your character

In her post, Kieffer writes:

Deep POV is a technique used to get inside the mind of a character and make a deep emotional connection with readers. To do so, the author must remove nearly all traces of authorship from the page. The less that the reader remembers that they are reading, the more effective the Deep POV. You want to hold your reader enthralled.

She proceeds with a list of ways to write in Deep POV and provides very helpful, concrete examples.

Here’s an example of the changes I’ve made to my manuscript using Kieffer’s suggestions:

OUT of DEEP POV:

Lady Catherine, the dowager Countess of Bentwick, had hid her disappointment well when she discovered the Duke was with other gentlemen discussing politics.  Obviously, he was not hunting for a wife this evening and so she had to move on and try to find Charlotte’s match elsewhere.

BETTER POV:

Charlotte hid a small smile behind a gloved hand when her mother’s brows furrowed upon discovering the Duke was with other gentlemen discussing politics.  “Do try to hide your disappointment mother.  Somersby is not looking for a wife and I would at least like to marry a man who wants to marry.”

Catherine smirked.  “No man wants to marry.”  She leaned towards her daughter.  “I don’t believe you realize how dire our situation is my darling.”

What do you think?  Any suggestions or sources you like to read to improve your writing?  Do you prefer deep POV or not?  Would love to hear from you!

Caryn Emme Sign Off

Review: The Duke’s Disaster

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The Good:

  • The novel began with a bang – a really great concept with lots of tension and promise for a wonderful novel
  • Noah Winters is a great alpha
  • Thea Collins is a believable heroine with an interesting backstory
  • Noah’s support of Thea near the end is touching (expected, but nicely written nonetheless)
  • I wish I had more “Good” because I really wanted to like this one

The Meh:

  • Plot moved at a snail’s pace
  • Noah was so lovable I had a hard time believing he wasn’t nice, even though we were repeatedly told he wasn’t, his every action was that of a nice, thoughtful person
  • The Winters’ family history was difficult to piece together
  • The minor characters did not enrich the story
  • I didn’t find their inner conflict compelling enough to keep them from HEA sooner
  • While the sweet breakfast routine was a nice way to show the couple getting closer together, it, like everything else in this novel, became stale rather quickly

Overall:

  • I wouldn’t recommend this novel, but I have a feeling it was a poor introduction to the writing of Ms. Burrowes
  • The conflicts were not complex, or perhaps were not developed enough – I’m not sure what it was but I was unable to connect with the story and characters
  • Simply put, it was a boring novel – many a time I found myself closing it and loudly saying “Oh for crying out loud!”
  • The final scenes of violence were not very believable
  • Save yourself the time and perhaps give another of Grace Burrowes’ novels a try, I know I will.

Thanks for reading!  Any comments on this or another Grace Burrowes novel?

Summary from Goodreads:  Noah Winters, Earl of Anselm, spent months sorting and courting the year’s crop of debutantes in search of an ideal bride. When the sweet, biddable young thing he selected accepts another’s proposal, Noah decides to court her companion instead.  Thea Collins, though, is anything but biddable. She has learned the hard way that men are not to be trusted, especially the handsome ones. When she reluctantly accepts, Noah rushes Thea to the altar before she can reveal her deepest secret. Can she finally move on from her past, or will it come back to haunt her?

Caryn Emme Sign Off