Writing in Deep POV

Point of View is one of those features of writing that when done well, it flawlessly takes readers through a story and brings us into each character.  When not, it frustrates readers.

Poorly edited POV is akin to being thrown into a story without the security of being safely steered through it.

This is why I have been deeply editing my manuscript.  I love stories that really take us into character and I am making the changes necessary to bring that depth into my first Regency.  And, it is tough.  So very tough.

However, the universe seems to always have answers for me when I feel lost.  My answer came on Pinterest this week in the form of a post at She’s Novel by Kristen Kieffer published April 23, 2015: How to Write in Deep POV + get inside the mind of your character

In her post, Kieffer writes:

Deep POV is a technique used to get inside the mind of a character and make a deep emotional connection with readers. To do so, the author must remove nearly all traces of authorship from the page. The less that the reader remembers that they are reading, the more effective the Deep POV. You want to hold your reader enthralled.

She proceeds with a list of ways to write in Deep POV and provides very helpful, concrete examples.

Here’s an example of the changes I’ve made to my manuscript using Kieffer’s suggestions:

OUT of DEEP POV:

Lady Catherine, the dowager Countess of Bentwick, had hid her disappointment well when she discovered the Duke was with other gentlemen discussing politics.  Obviously, he was not hunting for a wife this evening and so she had to move on and try to find Charlotte’s match elsewhere.

BETTER POV:

Charlotte hid a small smile behind a gloved hand when her mother’s brows furrowed upon discovering the Duke was with other gentlemen discussing politics.  “Do try to hide your disappointment mother.  Somersby is not looking for a wife and I would at least like to marry a man who wants to marry.”

Catherine smirked.  “No man wants to marry.”  She leaned towards her daughter.  “I don’t believe you realize how dire our situation is my darling.”

What do you think?  Any suggestions or sources you like to read to improve your writing?  Do you prefer deep POV or not?  Would love to hear from you!

Caryn Emme Sign Off

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