Snail’s Pace #AmWriting #Publishing

home-office-336377_640Becoming a writer has been a life-long dream. And, the thing is, I am a writer. An unpublished writer. Ugh.

I’ve blogged here and at Bookmarks. I’ve written short stories and a children’s novel.

More recently, I followed my heart and wrote what I love: a romance novel. A Regency to be exact. I have a shaky platform and virtually no writing credentials – at least none that publishing houses would take seriously.

So I have edited my manuscript, sculpted it by using every bit of research on editing I can find. And, I am so very proud of the final product.

Except, it’s as ready as I can make it. With numerous beta-reads, proof-reads, editing for continuity of character, plot, theme, setting and dialogue, there’s not much more I can do.

Now I face the prospect of publishing – which strangely enough has had me stuck for the past two months. I’ve used the excuse of summer holidays and busyness with the family to delay the inevitable. School’s back in. I’m working part-time – I have the time to see my dream through.

The choice now seems to send it off for more rejection letters OR perhaps, I will finally dive and tread my way through the self-publishing sea.

I believe it will be the latter for me.

Any advice?

Caryn Emme Sign Off

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Confident or Brat? #AmWriting

There is a fine line between a man who knows what he wants and will not stop until he gets it, and the man who makes a lot of noise expecting others to get him what he wants.

The first kind of man inspires confidence and admiration because those in his circle know he will achieve his goal with dignity and grace.

The second causes groans, tension, stress and the inevitable eye-roll.

How to make sure your hero is the first kind of man, not the second? Here’s a checklist for you:

  1. Your hero takes responsibility for his behaviour and words.
  2. Your hero never blames anyone else for the circumstances in which he finds himself.
  3. Your hero loves your heroine so fully he does not look to her to feel more of a man or to heal any residual pain from his past.
  4. Your hero leads gently but firmly and cares for those under his protection.
  5. Your hero knows his mind and understands the consequences of his decisions – especially how the heroine will be impacted.

How to spot a brat in your hero? Here’s another checklist:

  1. Your hero deflects the influence of his words or actions.
  2. Your hero looks for places/people who are responsible for his angst/plight.
  3. Your hero needs your heroine rather than loves her. (It’s ok for him to need her love after love has flourished, but if she is needed for psychological well-being rather than being pursued for who she is – there is a fundamental flaw in the hero)
  4. Your hero mistreats those who serve or help him.
  5. Your hero acts rashly refusing to weigh the consequences of his decisions on the heroine or those under his care.

What are your definitely/definitely-not traits when creating the hero for your novels? I hope you’re inspired to keep writing swoon-worthy men.

Caryn Emme Sign Off